Bend Firefighters at Shevlin-Hixon Historic Photo

Bend Firefighters at Shevlin-Hixon Historic Photo

Regular price $19.00 Sale

A wonderfully detailed photograph showcasing the Bend Fire Department members staged around their 1919 American LaFrance Type 12 pumper and the chiefs rig.  They are standing on the old Shevlin-Hixon Mill grounds.

Kodak Endura Prints - Our standard print is on Kodak Endura Professional photo paper with a fine grain pebble texture.  Kodak Endura uses state-of-the-art image stability and lasts 100+ years in a typical home setting.

Metal Prints - Metal Prints are a one-of-a-kind artform where our images are transferred directly onto aluminum and preserved with state of the art glossy finishes that make everyone say WOW!  I bet you have never seen a more brilliant and impressive print!  The colors are vibrant and the luminescence is amazing.  Our metal prints feature 1/8" rounded corners and a custom mounting system that 'floats' the image off the wall by 1/2 inch (see photo).


Shevlin-Hixon Mill Bend, Oreogon c. 1930
Shevlin-Hixon Mill Bend, Oreogon c. 1930

In 1916, the Shevlin-Hixon Lumber Company built a mill on the west bank of the Deschutes River in Bend and began heavy cutting on more than 200,000 acres of company-owned ponderosa pine forest. The same year, another Minnesota-based company, Brooks-Scanlon Lumber Company, built a competing mill on the opposite side of the river. Soon, each mill was producing around 200 million feet of lumber a year.  At their peak, the companies were two of the largest pine sawmills in the world, running around the clock, employing more than 2,000 workers each and turning out more than 500 million board feet of lumber a year. Bend’s population jumped from 536 in 1910 to 5,414 in 1920. By 1930, the city’s population was 8,821 and unemployment was low.

The companies did not practice sustainable harvesting and continued producing at full capacity. Both continued to buy more of the region’s timberlands to feed mill production. They ran several work shifts daily and regularly updated their technology and capacity. In 1937, the Bend Chamber of Commerce determined that the city would face severe economic depression if sustainable forestry was not practiced. By the early 1950s, the forests were depleted and the large mills shut down. The remaining smaller mills turned to making plywood, particle-board, and molding.

Further Reading:

Written in part by Kathy Tucker, © Oregon Historical Society.